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Sculpture in Chicago: The Next Generation

Monday, May 18, 1998–Saturday, June 13, 1998

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Artists: John Arndt, Brett Bloom, Stephanie Brooks, Fred Bruney, M. W. Burns, Gary Cannone, CAR, Patrick Collier, Megan Cump, Robert Jake Jacobs, Paul Kass, D’nell Larson, Tom McDonald, Patrick McGee, Carlos Melian, Adelheid Mers, Lisa Norton, Michael Piazza, Joel Ross, Mindy Rose Schwartz, Mike Slatterly, Margaret Walsh, Barbara Wiesen, Charles Wiesen, Rob Weingart, and Sarah Whipple

Sculpture in Chicago: The Next Generation, a selection of up-and-coming Chicago-area sculptors, is held in conjunction with Sculpture 17: The 17th International Sculpture Conference. The range of media employed by these artists reflects a breaking down and opening up of the field of sculpture. Video, light projections, and computer-generated work are all represented, as well as installations and more traditional forms of sculpture. Including a wide range of work from a diverse group of sculptors, this exhibit begs the question: Is there a new sculptural aesthetic in Chicago? Instead of proposing a succinct thesis on what constitutes sculpture in Chicago, this exhibit opens up a discourse on new sculptural issues.

Since 1960 the International Sculpture Conferences have earned a reputation for excellence in addressing pertinent topics related to the process and philosophies of sculpture. The conference offers artists, curators, educators, writers, technicians, and collectors an opportunity to have a voice in the dialogue that often becomes a point of reference for the sculpture field. Gallery 400 ’s exhibition is unique among the events in the city surrounding Sculpture 17, as it is the only gallery concentrating exclusively on Chicago sculptors.

Sculpture 17 centers around three days of keynote addresses, panel discussions, and individual presentations by dynamic leaders in the field of sculpture. Technical demonstrations, films on sculpture, networking sessions, a gallery walk, a slide registry, evening social events, tours of local sites of interest and three days of pre-conference technical workshops supplemented the main program. In addition, a trade show of over forty exhibitors who cater to the needs of the sculpture community is open to conference participants at the conference headquarters. Mayor Richard M. Daley serves as chair of the Sculpture 17 Chicago Host Planning Committee, a working committee of over forty sculptors and representatives from the many diverse Chicago-area cultural institutions and organizations. Committee members include representatives from the Art Institute of Chicago and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Chicago Architecture Foundation, and the Chicago Artists Coalition, among others.

PRESS RELEASE

SCULPTURE CONFERENCE COMES TO CHICAGO IN ’98

The International Sculpture Center (ISC) announces that Chicago, Illinois, will be the site for Sculpture 17: The 17th International Sculpture Conference, May 21–23, 1998. The conference will be headquartered at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, ideally situated within walking distance of the Magnificent Mile, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Navy Pier, and hundreds of restaurants and attractions.

Over two thousand people from all over the world who are passionate about sculpture are expected to attend Sculpture 17. Since 1960, the International Sculpture Conferences have earned an international reputation for excellence in addressing the most pertinent topics related to the processes and philosophies of sculpture. The conferences offer artists, curators, collectors, educators, writers, technicians, and other sculpture enthusiasts the unique opportunity to have a voice in the dialogue that will become a point of reference for the entire sculpture field.

Sculpture 17 will be centered around three days (May 21–23) of keynote addresses, panel discussions, and individual presentations by dynamic leaders in the field of sculpture. Technical demonstrations, films on sculpture, networking sessions, a gallery walk, a slide registry, evening social events, tours of local sites of interest, and three days of pre-conference technical workshops (May 17–19) will supplement the main program. In addition, a trade show of over forty exhibitors who cater to the needs of the sculpture community will be open to conference participants at the conference headquarters.

CHICAGO AND SCULPTURE 17

In recognition of the powerful impact that the convergence of Sculpture 17 and Chicago’s thriving cultural community will have, Mayor Richard M. Daley has issued a proclamation declaring May 1998 International Sculpture Month. Many of Chicago’s cultural institutions will use Sculpture 17 as an opportunity to showcase their finest sculpture facilities, exhibitions, and educational programs, facilitating unprecedented community involvement in the history of ISC Conferences.

Mayor Daley will serve as chair of the Sculpture 17 Chicago Host Planning Committee, a working committee of over forty sculptors and representatives from the many diverse Chicago-area cultural institutions and organizations. Committee members include representatives from the Art Institute of Chicago and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Chicago Architecture Foundation, and the Chicago Artists Coalition, among others. The committee addresses ways to integrate the unique aspects of the host community into the Sculpture 17 program and surrounding events. Plans already underway include sculpture exhibitions at both public and private venues citywide, the expansion of the Pier Walk Sculpture exhibition to include over 150 sculptures at Chicago’s newly renovated Navy Pier, specialized tours of indoor and outdoor sculpture collections and architecture, and much more.

“Chicago will be the center of the international sculpture community in May of 1998,” says ISC Executive Director Jeanne C. Pond. “With the ardent enthusiasm and substantial commitments demonstrated by Mayor Daley and the Host Planning Committee, combined with Chicago’s unrivaled display of public art and architecture and thriving arts community, Sculpture 17 promises to be one of the most dynamic and stimulating conferences the art world has ever seen.”

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL SCULPTURE CENTER

The Intemational Sculpture Center (ISC) is a not-for-profit 501 (c)(3) organization dedicated to advancing the creation and understanding of sculpture and its unique, vital contribution to society. This mission begins with the ISC’s 10,000+ international membership base and extends to the entire world through the four-color monthly publication Sculpture, exhibitions and educational programs, including the International Sculpture Conferences. For more information, contact the ISC at 202.785.1144.

PRINT COLLATERAL

Postcard: Sculpture in Chicago: The Next Generation – Opening Reception

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST

John Arndt

Cone, 1997
Watercolor on paper and paintbrush handle stub, 2 x 4 x 2 in.

Lizard, 1997
Bronze, 3 x 10 x 7 in.

No Cigar, 1997
Watercolor and inkjet print on paper, 1 x 1 x 7 in.

Oak Leaf, 1997
Watercolor on Gonzalez-Torres paper, 6 x 5 in.

Pastime, 1998
Ink on acrylic on wood, 9 in. diameter

Sandwich, 1998
Acrylic on MDO and construction adhesive, 1 x 1 x 4 in.

Video, 1998
Acrylic and Plexiglas on wood, 1 x 4 x 7 in.

Brett Bloom

Dropped Ceiling for a Dropped History: Monument to the 8-Hour Work Day, 1998
Mixed media, dimensions variable

Stephanie Brooks

Last Name First, 1998
Steel and acrylic, 5 1/2 x 59 x 1/2 in.

Fred Bruney

Produce But No Use / Sense But No Cents, 1993
Mixed media, dimensions variable

M. W. Burns

Vent, 1998
Sound system, dimensions variable

Gary Cannone

Some Songs for Sculpture in Chicago: The Next Generation Exhibition (Gallery 400), 1998
CD, 5 in. diameter

CAR (Joel Fennel and John Shearer)

Betty, 1998
Mixed-media installation, dimensions variable

Patrick Collier

Counsel, 1997
Cibachrome print, 13 1/2 x 19 in.

I Know What I Like, 1997
Cibachrome print, 13 1/2 x 19 in.

Mixed Myth, 1997
Clay, acrylic, and mixed media, 10 1/2 x 5 x 4 1/2 in.

Raising Baby, 1997
Clay, acrylic, and mixed media, 6 x 10 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

Untitled (With a Vengeance), 1997
Clay, acrylic, and mixed media, 7 x 4 x 8 1/2 in.

Megan Cump

Scarlet Spreading, 1998
Plastic, glitter, and quail eggs, 18 x 24 x 12 in.

Swarm, 1998
Plastic and glitter, dimensions variable

Untitled, 1997
Ilfochrome print, 22 x 32 in.

Jake

Play, 1998
Books, model train tracks, marbles, and buckets, dimensions variable

Paul Kass

Timberpieces, 1998
Concrete and wood, 12 x 47 x 22 in.

D’nell Larson

Bubbles, 1998
Wood, resin, and paint, dimensions variable

Rectangular Obscenity, 1997
Wood, steel, and paint, 51 x 41 x 38 in.

Tom McDonald

Aeroplane, 1998
Found objects, 5 x 20 x 15 in.

Patrick McGee

Flection, 1998
Canvas and rubber, dimensions variable

Carlos Melian

Sin Titulo (Caja de Cardboard, Blanca, Caja de Cardboard, Blanca), 1998
Cardboard, wood, and Plexiglas, 34 1/2 x 33 x 3 1/2 in. each

Sin Titulo (Caja de Cardboard, Blanca, Caja de Cardboard, Blanca), 1998
Mixed media, 47 1/2 x 43 x 4 in. each

Adelheid Mers

Moriones, Stulti, Fatui, 1998
Ellipsoidals, aluminum templets, and color gels, dimensions variable

Lisa Norton

Coat / Purse Rack, 1997
MDF, plastic, and steel, 6 x 57 x 4 in.

Space Saver, 1997
Steel, glass, and rubber, 14 x 24 x 11 in.

Michael Piazza

Correctional Course, 1998
Mixed-media installation, dimensions variable

Joel Ross

Room 28, 1997
Mixed media, 64 x 72 x 64 in.

Mindy Rose Schwartz

Belts, 1998
Aluminum and nylon, 8 x 12 x 18 each

Clingie, 1998
Plastic and wire, dimensions variable

Spruced-Up
, 1998
Sculpture from parents’ home and paint, 18 x 20 x 8 in.

Mike Slattery

Vagabond, 1995
Mixed media, 84 x 72 x 108 in.

Rob Weingart

Pile, 1997
Silicon and latex, 10 x 10 x 8 in.

Weave, 1997
Latex, 12 x 14 x 1 in.

Margaret Welsh

The Millennium, 1998
Video

Sarah Whipple

Untitled (Warp), 1998
MDF, urethane, and enamel, 23.5 x 66 x 1 in.

Untitled (Warp), 1998
MDF, urethane, and enamel, 64 x 18 x 1 in.

Barbara Wiesen

Dress, 1997
Vinyl, hook, and hanger, 44 x 17 x 2 in.

Limb, 1995
Plaster, 12 x 7 x 8 in.

Waist, 1997
Plaster, 1 x 10 x 7 in.

Charles Wiesen

Behaviors, 1998
Paint, plywood, studs, and wedges, 144 x 42 x 4 in.

Step
, 1997
Wood and paint, 4 x 24 x 19 in.

EXHIBITION SUPPORT

Sculpture in Chicago: The Next Generation is held in conjunction with the 17th International Sculpture Center Conference hosted by the International Sculpture Center. The exhibition is made possible by the School of Art and Design, the College of Architecture and the Arts, and is supported in part by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency.

Karen Indeck Head ShotKaren Indeck has been the curator and director of Gallery 400 and the Visiting Artists-in-Residence Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago since 1986. She has curated numerous shows, including FAXART (1990), Influx (1993), Anything and Architecture (1996), and Selected Works from the Refco Selection (1997). Indeck received a BFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Dennis Kowalski Head ShotChicago Tribune art critic Alan Artner called Dennis Kowlaski “one of the few real maverick artists in the city.” Kowalski prefers to show his work in spaces that have more of an experimental atmosphere as opposed to a commercial one. Previous exhibitions include How Does Astroturf and Water Mix? (1993), which had one work consisting of Astroturf patches supporting coils of rubber garden hose. Inside each sculpture was a small black-and-white photograph of a nature scene.

Kowalski began his education studying architecture, and then briefly industrial design, before deciding on sculpture. He has served as an associate professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago since 1971. Kowalski earned a BFA and an MFA in sculpture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.