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Nice Work If You Can Get It

Friday, June 27, 2014–Saturday, August 09, 2014

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Artists: Arturo Hernández Alcázar, Ramón Miranda Beltrán, Melanie Gilligan, The Ladydrawers, Mary Lum, Yoshua Okón, Pocket Guide to Hell, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Pilvi Takala, Ward Shelley, and Andrew Norman Wilson

Through a variety of media and approaches, the artists in Nice Work If You Can Get It address the vital pocketbook issue of how citizens sustain themselves in today ’s global economy. In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, seismic shifts in our economic realities have forever changed our relationships to traditional concepts of labor, equity, and exchange. Believing in the potency of the arts and humanities to illuminate civic issues in our communities, Gallery 400 brings together eleven artists that investigate this changing landscape of labor. Exploring the legacies of industry, immaterial labor, service work, invisible labor and more, the artists featured in the exhibition articulate a variety of responses to the relationships between labor, economy, and politics.

Nice Work If You Can Get It is part of an ongoing series of exhibitions that explore shifts in industry and work, how and where economic exchange takes place, new models for sustainable economies, employment-driven migration, and relationships between place, work, and economic viability. A key component of this series is community involvement. Developed through partnerships with community organizations, labor unions, and artists, the relationships and dialogues with these groups will help guide forthcoming exhibitions and events.

A supplement to Nice Work If You Can Get It, the Standard of Living Reading Room includes texts and resources that explore the legacies of industry, immaterial labor, service work, invisible labor and more, articulating a variety of responses to the relationships between labor, economy, and politics.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Nice Work If You Can Get It


Gallery 400
June 27-August 2, 2014

Image: Karina Skvirsky, Gioconda, 2007-2009, video, 7:40 min. (still).

June 13, 2014—Chicago, IL— Nice Work If You Can Get It, curated by Lorelei Stewart, addresses the vital pocketbook issue of how citizens sustain themselves in today ’s global economy. In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, seismic shifts in our economic realities have forever changed our relationships to traditional concepts of labor, equity, and exchange. Believing in the potency of the arts and humanities to illuminate civic issues in our communities, Gallery 400 brings together eleven artists—Arturo Hernández Alcázar, Ramón Miranda Beltrán, Melanie Gilligan, The Ladydrawers, Mary Lum, Yoshua Okón, Pocket Guide to Hell, Karina Skvirsky, Pilvi Takala, Ward Shelley, and Andrew Norman Wilson— that investigate this changing landscape of labor. Exploring the legacies of industry, immaterial labor, service work, invisible labor and more, the artists featured in the exhibition articulate a variety of responses to the relationships between labor, economy, and politics.

Ramón Miranda Beltrán ’s work investigates a historical moment from the 1933 ChicagoTeacher Revolt in simultaneity with the recent 2012 Chicago Teacher ’s Union Strike. Arturo Hernández Alcázar ’s No Trabajes Nunca / Ne Travailez Jamais / Never Work explores the dynamics of circulation and reassignment of value in the capitalist system by looking at the activity of rescuing and recycling valuable materials. Melanie Gilligan ’s video series, Self- Capital, centers on a personified Global Economy undergoing radical therapeutic treatment after her recent meltdown, suggesting the effects of the crisis are felt on the corporeal level. The Ladydrawers use data from original research conducted in the public realm by students, interns, volunteers, and supporters around the globe and transform it into comic books, strips, posters, postcards, games, and apparel. A product of this research and collaboration, Our Fashion Year is an in-depth series of comics journalism reports on gender and labor. Composed of paper bag fragments stamped with the name of the individual who oversaw their production and quality control on the assembly line, Mary Lum ’s Tinker Tailor Soldier Sailor reminds us of the human element behind industrialized production and the objects we use on a daily basis. Shot on location at a Los Angeles Home Depot store, Yoshua Okón ’s Octopus focuses on the relationships among Guatemalan day laborers who at home fought on opposite sides of the Guatemalan civil war, yet in the U.S. are working side-by-side in their efforts to find employment. Pocket Guide to Hell ’s posters and ephemera document their labor history reenactments, while Ward Shelley, in Work, Spend, Forget, plots the 20th-century shift from production-oriented capitalism to consumer-oriented capitalism, connecting people and social movements in a complex and evolving organism. Karina Skvirsky ’s Gioconda explores the situation of recent immigrants who work long hours at menial jobs long after their emigration. Pilvi Takala ’s The Trainee reveals a spectrum of ways of looking after the odd member in a group, in this case a strange co-worker who disrupts workplace behavior patterns by spending her day doing nothing. Andrew Norman Wilson ’s ScanOps reveal issues of class, race, and labor through Google Books images in which software distortions, the scanning site, and the hands of the book-scanning “ScanOps” employees are visible.

Nice Work If You Can Get It is part of an ongoing series of exhibitions that explore shifts in industry and work, how and where economic exchange takes place, new models for
sustainable economies, employment-driven migration, and relationships between place, work, and economic viability. A key component of this series is community involvement. Developed through partnerships with community organizations, labor unions, and artists, the relationships and dialogues with these groups will help guide forthcoming exhibitions and events.

Related Programs:

Opening Reception, Friday, June 27, 5-8pm

Delano Manongs: Forgotten Heroes of the American Farm Workers,

screening, Saturday, July 12, 2pm

Delano Manongs: Forgotten Heroes of the American Farm Workers
tells the story of farm labor organizer Larry Itliong and a group of Filipino farm workers who instigated one of the American farm labor movement ’s finest hours – The Delano Grape Strike of 1965 that brought about the creation of the United Farm Workers Union (UFW). While the movement is known for Cesar Chavez ’s leadership and considered a Chicano movement, Filipinos played a pivotal role. Filipino labor organizer, Larry Itliong, a cigar-chomping union veteran, organized a group of 1500 Filipinos to strike against the grape growers of Delano, California, beginning a collaboration between Filipinos, Chicanos and other ethnic workers that would go on for years.

From Semis to Startups: Exploring Fulton Market’s Changing Industrial Landscape,

a walking tour with Emma Saperstein and Pocket Guide to Hell, Wednesday, July 30, 7-8:30pm

Join Pocket Guide to Hell and Emma Saperstein as they guide you through a tour of Chicago ’s Fulton Market. 7 sites will be activated to tell the long history of the Fulton Market/Randolph Street area, starting in the late nineteenth century and culminating with the recent period of change. Pocket Guide to Hell—coined after a quip from a visiting British labor leader around 1900—believes that in telling the story of Chicago, one is also telling the larger stories of life in a city and in nineteenth century America. Their guerilla walking tours are open to everyone, but are especially geared towards those that live in the city and want to know more about it. Pocket Guide to Hell ’s tours involve a strong narrative and primary research—from scrapbooks to interviews to newspapers—and all focus on some aspect of labor history, social justice, or true crime. All put accessibility first.

Our Fashion Year: Unraveling the Threads Between the Garment and Sex Trades,

lecture by Anne Elizabeth Moore, Thursday, August 7, 6pm

Our Fashion Year, an exploration of international women’s labor in words and pictures, unravels the threads that weave together fast fashion and human trafficking in a brilliant series of full-color, non-fiction comic strips. What is the connection between the garment industry and the sex industry? What do brothel raids in Cambodia mean for your clothing budget? Why do one-seventh of the world’s women work in the apparel sector? Why is sex work so reviled where neoliberal capital has the strongest hold? Why do international apparel companies produce clothing well beyond the means of consumers to purchase them, much less purchase them ethically? And how does the flow of capital particularly disadvantage women, everywhere in the world? Rarely are these questions asked—and never before have they been answered— in sassy, smart, full-color images by top comics artists and journalists of today. Our Fashion Year is an original approach to the unique questions that underpin contemporary global culture.

This presentation, by cultural critic and comics creator Anne Elizabeth Moore (the first in Chicago, following a worldwide Ladydrawers tour) will look at the process, form, and impact of the Ladydrawers’ work on labor, gender, and compensation through the full spate of Truthout strips from the last year.

Tours:

Gallery 400 offers guided tours for groups of all ages. Tours are free of charge but require reservation. Please complete our online form (accessible at gallery400.uic.edu/visit/tours) to schedule a tour of Nice Work If You Can Get It. For more information, or to discuss the specific needs and interests of your group, please contact us at 312 996 6114 or gallery400@uic.edu.

Nice Work If You Can Get It is supported by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; the School of Art & Art History, the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts, University of Illinois at Chicago; and a grant from the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency. The programming and community engagement for this exhibition was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Founded in 1983, Gallery 400 is one of the nation’s most vibrant university galleries, showcasing work at the leading edge of contemporary art, architecture, and design. The Gallery’s program of exhibitions, lectures, film and video screenings, and performances features interdisciplinary and experimental practices. Operating within the School of Art and Art History in the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Gallery 400 endeavors to make the arts and its practitioners accessible to a broad spectrum of the public and to cultivate a variety of cultural and intellectual perspectives. Gallery 400 is recognized for its support of the creation of new work, the diversity of its programs and participants, and the development of experimental models for multidisciplinary exhibition.

PRINT COLLATERAL

Postcard: Nice Work If You Can Get It

Poster: Nice Work If You Can Get It

CURATOR BIOGRAPHY

Lorelei Stewart Head ShotLorelei Stewart, Director of Gallery 400 since 2000, has organized over 40 exhibitions, including the Joyce Award-winning exhibition Edgar Arceneaux: The Alchemy of Comedy…Stupid (2006). In 2002, she initiated the acclaimed At the Edge: Innovative Art in Chicago series, a commissioning program that encouraged Chicago area artists’ experimental practices. She holds a BA from Smith College, a BFA from Corcoran College of Art and Design, and an MA in Curatorial Studies from Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College.

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST

Arturo Hernández Alcazar

No Trabajes Nunca: Renovación (transformación del cono y de la energia en sopa caliente) / Never Work: Renewal (transformation of knowledge into work, work into energy, and energy into hot soup), 2010 – 2012
Horn speakers, hammer, vinyl disc, copper disc, grill, envelope with drawings and documents, turntables, sound cables, amplifier, and base, dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist and Galeria MARSO

Ramón Miranda Beltrán

To Collapse Invisible Walls, 2014
Photo transfer on concrete and poster, 36 x 72 in.
Courtesy the artist and Walter Otero Contemporary Art

Melanie Gilligan

Self Capital, 2009
Video, 23:39 min. loop
Courtesy the artist

The Ladydrawers

Our Fashion Year, 2013-2014
Giclée prints, 20 x 40 in. each
Courtesy the artists

Mary Lum

Tinker Tailor Soldier Sailor, 2011
Paper bag fragments, paint, dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist and Carroll and Sons, Boston

Yoshua Okón

Octopus, 2011
Video installation, 2 synchronized projections, 18:31 min. loop
Courtesy the artist

Pocket Guide to Hell

“Hunger” Banner, from the 1915 Parade of the Unemployed reenactment, March 6, 2011
Fabricator: Michelle Faust

Poster from the 1915 Parade of the Unemployed reenactment, March 6, 2011
Designer: Lauren Meranda

Poster, from the Battle of the Halsted Viaduct reenactment, May 2, 2010
Designer: Alana Bailey

Poster, from the Haymarket reenactment, April 30, 2011
Designer: Zach Dodson

Photographs, from the Haymarket reenactment, April 30, 2011
Photographer: Yoni Goldstein and Paul J. Durica

1886 police costume worn by Pete Crowley, from the Haymarket reenactment, April 30, 2011
Fabricators: Michelle Faust and Kenneth Morrison

Handbill, from the Haymarket reenactment, April 30, 2011
Designer: April Sheridan, Center for Book and Paper Arts, Columbia College

Various costume accessories, from the Haymarket reenactment, April 30, 2011
Fabricators: Michelle Faust and Kenneth Morrison

Ward Shelley

Work, Spend, Forget (Dissected Frog Polemic), 2013
Acrylic and toner on mylar, 34 1/4 x 75 in.
Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery

Karina Skvirsky

Gioconda, 2009
Video, 7:40 min. loop
Courtesy the artist

Pilvi Takala

The Trainee, 2008
Video, 13:52 min. loop
Courtesy the artist and Carlos/Ishikawa London

Andrew Norman Wilson

A Picturesque Tour along the Rivers Ganges and Jumna, in India- frontispiece, June 2014
Inkjet print on rag paper, painted frame, aluminum composite material, 8 x 10 in.

Mother Goose’s Melody, or Sonnets for the Cradle, in Two Parts: Part I Contains the Most Celebrated Songs and Lullabies of the Good Old Nurses, Calculated to Amuse Children and to Excite Them to Sleep, 2014
Ink-jet print on rag paper, painted frame, aluminum composite material, 8 x 10 in.

Mother Goose’s Melody, or Sonnets for the Cradle, in Two Parts: Part II Those of that Sweet Songster and Nurse of Wit and Humour, Master William Shakespeare, 2014
Ink-jet print on rag paper, painted frame, aluminum composite material, 8 x 10 in.

Museum Metallicum Autoris- 35, June 2014
Inkjet print on rag paper, painted frame, aluminum composite material, 8 x 10 in.

Courtesy the artist

G4 0506 522x300

STANDARD OF LIVING READING ROOM

In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, seismic shifts in our economic realities have forever changed our relationships to traditional concepts of labor, equity, and exchange. Believing in the potency of the arts and humanities to illuminate civic issues in our communities, Gallery 400 will present three exhibitions in 2014–2015 that investigate this changing landscape of labor. As one of the nation ’s most vibrant university galleries, Gallery 400 is uniquely positioned to address how these economic issues affect local communities, presenting contemporary art as a nexus for social interaction, transformative experience, and multi-dimensional learning.

The reading room is a supplement to Standard of Living: Art and 21st Century Economies and Work, an ongoing series of exhibitions that explore shifts in industry and work, how and where economic exchange takes place, new models for sustainable economies, employment-driven migration, and relationships between place, work, and economic viability. Exploring the legacies of industry, immaterial labor, service work, invisible labor and more, the texts and resources in Gallery 400’s reading room articulate a variety of responses to the relationships between labor, economy, and politics. Not only does this material offer invaluable information and critical reflection, but also educates, entertains, and acts as a springboard for community dialogues about future exhibitions and public programs.

Can’t make it to the reading room? You’re in luck, because we have a virtual reading room, too!

Exhibition Checklist (expanded)

Arturo Hernández Alcazar

No Trabajes Nunca: Renovación (transformación del cono y de la energia en sopa caliente) / Never Work: Renewal (transformation of knowledge into work, work into energy, and energy into hot soup), 2010 – 2012
Horn speakers, hammer, vinyl disc, copper disc, grill, envelope with drawings and documents, turntables, sound cables, amplifier, and base, dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist and Galeria MARSO

Exploring the dynamics of circulation and value reassignment, No Trabajes Nunca (Never Work) reveals the failed efforts of commercial, material, and energy transformation. The audio installation combines the sound of scrap merchants in Mexico City, who are retrieving valuable metal components from old electronics, with the aural residue of a disc made of recycled copper. Also included are documents and items that reveal labor, economic, and environmental, conditions surrounding copper mining, trading, and retrieval.

Ramón Miranda Beltrán

To Collapse Invisible Walls, 2014
Photo transfer on concrete and poster, 36 x 72 in.
Courtesy the artist and Walter Otero Contemporary Art

In To Collapse Invisible Walls, Ramón Miranda Beltrán uses a historical image of the Chicago Teacher Revolt of 1933 evoking current debates about the role of public education in a faltering economy. Chicago teachers deeply felt the impact of the Great Depression: hundreds were laid off and those that weren ’t often went weeks or months without pay, class sizes swelled, and facilities were inadequate—particularly in immigrant neighborhoods. In response, for four months thousands of teachers regularly stormed board of education and city council meetings. The actions of the Revolt of 1933 laid the foundations for the Chicago Teachers Union, which was established in 1937. Juxtaposed with this image is a poster of La escuela del maestro Rafael Cordero (1890–92) by Puerto Rican artist Francisco Oller. Oller—a self-educated man—provided free schooling to children regardless of their race or class and is often referred to as the father of public education in Puerto Rico. In the wake of the 2012 Chicago Teacher ’s Union strike and a 2014 teacher ’s strike in Puerto Rico, To Collapse Invisible Walls urges us to consider how closely related these struggles are and their larger implications.

Melanie Gilligan

Self Capital, 2009
Video, 23:39 min. loop
Courtesy the artist

Introducing herself as the “global economy,” the actress in Melanie Gilligan ’s multi-episode video, Self Capital, undergoes experimental therapy for post- traumatic stress after her recent meltdown. Playing every role—therapist and patient, customer and cashier—the actress personifies the capitalist system as she attempts to regain control. In this video, Gilligan continues her ongoing investigations into the 2008 financial crisis and its subjective dimensions. The artist maps the economy ’s needs and desires onto the human body, thereby relating the implosion of the financial markets on a more personal, subjective level.

The Ladydrawers

Our Fashion Year, 2013-2014
Giclée prints, 20 x 40 in. each
Courtesy the artists

The Ladydrawers is a group of women, men, transgender, and non-binary gender writers and artists who create and publish comics on issues of economics, race, sexuality, and gender that impact culture.
Our Fashion Year is an in-depth series of “comics journalism” and published monthly on the online journal
Truthout reporting on gender and labor concerns throughout the global garment industry and international sex trade. The series explores circumstances at US retail outlets, Foreign Trade Zones, the links between national policies and labor abuses, and the working conditions of women in closed factories. Further strips from the year-long series can be viewed at truth-out.org.

Mary Lum

Tinker Tailor Soldier Sailor, 2011
Paper bag fragments, paint, dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist and Carroll and Sons, Boston

Mary Lum has been collecting the paper bag fragments in Tinker Tailor Soldier Sailor for more than 20 years. Stamped with the name of the individual that oversaw its production, each bag reminds us of the human element behind these industrially produced objects. Lum has stated: “I thought the names on the bags were especially charged, evoking both history and memory, as well as commenting on the relative anonymity of factory work.” The bold, abstract, painted wall on which the bags are placed evokes Russian Constructivist Alexander Rodchenko ’s Worker ’s Club (1925) and is Lum ’s personal call for workers to unite. The artist includes a composite passage of excerpts from pre- existing texts that provides a fictionalized glimpse into the life of a worker—thereby connecting the installation to all workers in any trade.

Source material for text:
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami Libra by Don DeLillo Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith Unravelling by Elizabeth Graver Men at Work by Graham Greene

Yoshua Okón

Octopus, 2011
Video installation, 2 synchronized projections, 18:31 min. loop
Courtesy the artist

Filmed at a Los Angeles Home Depot, Octopus choreographs evocations of the Guatemalan civil war with actual combatants who fought in the 1990s either for the guerillas or the military. The former combatants are Mayan undocumented immigrant day laborers who use the parking lot as their base. They navigate through the big-box parking lot—where they work side-by- side in their struggle to find work—with a dexterity and stealth required of guerilla warfare. The title references the nickname Guatemalans use for The United Fruit Company (today known as Chiquita Banana), a US company headquartered in Guatemala and connected to the CIA-led coup and subsequent civil war whose ‘tentacles ’ reached into both commerce and politics. In their home country, the men at the center of the video fought in a war manipulated by the US government and commercial interests. While in the US, they contend with similar forces in their struggle as undocumented, immigrant day laborers.

Pocket Guide to Hell

“Hunger” Banner, from the 1915 Parade of the Unemployed reenactment, March 6, 2011
Fabricator: Michelle Faust

Poster from the 1915 Parade of the Unemployed reenactment, March 6, 2011
Designer: Lauren Meranda

Poster, from the Battle of the Halsted Viaduct reenactment, May 2, 2010
Designer: Alana Bailey

Poster, from the Haymarket reenactment, April 30, 2011
Designer: Zach Dodson

Photographs, from the Haymarket reenactment, April 30, 2011
Photographer: Yoni Goldstein and Paul J. Durica

1886 police costume worn by Pete Crowley, from the Haymarket reenactment, April 30, 2011
Fabricators: Michelle Faust and Kenneth Morrison

Handbill, from the Haymarket reenactment, April 30, 2011
Designer: April Sheridan, Center for Book and Paper Arts, Columbia College

Various costume accessories, from the Haymarket reenactment, April 30, 2011
Fabricators: Michelle Faust and Kenneth Morrison

Believing that looking to the past enables a new understanding of our current moment, Pocket Guide to Hell stages reenactments and hosts guerilla-walking tours that focus on aspects of Chicago labor history and social justice. On view here are ephemera from past Pocket Guide to Hell reenactments of specific moments in Chicago ’s labor history—the Haymarket Affair, the Battle of the Halsted Viaduct, and the Parade of the Unemployed.
The Haymarket Affair, which took place on May 4, 1886, began as a peaceful rally supporting workers striking for an eight-hour workday. As the police attempted to disperse the crowd, a bomb was thrown by an unknown person, which sparked gunfire, killing seven police officers and at least four civilians. Following the incident, eight accused anarchists were convicted of conspiracy; seven of whom were sentenced to death.
On July 26, 1877 roughly 10,000 blue-collar workers from Bridgeport and Pilsen left their streetcars, ships, trains, and factories and clashed with police, federal troops, and state militia at the Halsted Street Viaduct (at 16th Street). The event was part of The Great Upheaval of 1877, which began in Baltimore as a railroad strike against wage cuts, then spread across the nation. Thirty workers died at The Battle of the Viaduct, 100 were wounded, and at least thirteen police officers were injured.
In January 1915, about 1,500 Chicagoans gathered at Hull House to discuss increasingly high levels of unemployment and hunger. Spontaneously, the group voted to march to City Hall to demand food relief and public works projects. The impromptu Parade ofthe Unemployed began traveling North on Halsted, reaching Madison before police broke up the event. Although arrests were made, marchers won in court where the rights to assemble peacefully and to petition the government were affirmed.

More information on these events and other important events in Illinois labor history are available at illinoislaborhistory.org.

Ward Shelley

Work, Spend, Forget (Dissected Frog Polemic), 2013
Acrylic and toner on mylar, 34 1/4 x 75 in.
Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery

Karina Skvirsky

Gioconda, 2009
Video, 7:40 min. loop
Courtesy the artist

Blurring the lines between documentary and fiction, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky ’s Gioconda focuses on the situation of immigrants that often make up large swaths of service and invisible labor in the United States. With the use of soundtracks from Hollywood “border films” and evocative stop-action shots, Skvirsky focuses on Gioconda, a hotel worker and recent immigrant, in order to explore the condition of immigrants that are forced to work long hours in menial jobs.

Pilvi Takala

The Trainee, 2008
Video, 13:52 min. loop
Courtesy the artist and Carlos/Ishikawa London

As part of a month-long performance, the artist worked as trainee “Johanna Takala” in the marketing department of Helsinki-based global consulting company, Deloitte. The resulting video documents this performance in which Takala enacts a string of peculiar behaviors—such as sitting still doing “brain work” at her desk and remaining on an elevator during an entire workday. The reactions of her colleagues reveal their discomfort with Takala ’s refusal to conform to the norms of the corporate workplace. Takala ’s intervention explores ideas behind corporate culture and expectations of productivity in the workplace.

Andrew Norman Wilson

A Picturesque Tour along the Rivers Ganges and Jumna, in India- frontispiece, June 2014
Inkjet print on rag paper, painted frame, aluminum composite material, 8 x 10 in.

Mother Goose’s Melody, or Sonnets for the Cradle, in Two Parts: Part I Contains the Most Celebrated Songs and Lullabies of the Good Old Nurses, Calculated to Amuse Children and to Excite Them to Sleep, 2014
Ink-jet print on rag paper, painted frame, aluminum composite material, 8 x 10 in.

Mother Goose’s Melody, or Sonnets for the Cradle, in Two Parts: Part II Those of that Sweet Songster and Nurse of Wit and Humour, Master William Shakespeare, 2014
Ink-jet print on rag paper, painted frame, aluminum composite material, 8 x 10 in.

Museum Metallicum Autoris- 35, June 2014
Inkjet print on rag paper, painted frame, aluminum composite material, 8 x 10 in.
Courtesy the artist

Andrew Norman Wilson ’s ScanOps series exposes the hidden people and processes behind Google Books. The artist collects irregularities from Google Books— for example, images that reveal software distortions or the hand of the Google employee responsible for the scanning. Amusing though the images may be when stumbled across online, they reveal the work
of a legion of invisible laborers, many of whom are treated quite differently than other Google employees, as documented in Wilson ’s Workers Leaving the Googleplex (2009–11), not included in this exhibition, but viewable at vimeo.com/15852288. However, the photographs act as a document not just of the marginalized populations and their labor, but everything else that that has colluded to create these glitches— cameras, software, books, capital, and all the other “equipment” within the Google factory.