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Indivisible: Stories of Chicago Communities

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Friday, May 25, 2001–Wednesday, June 06, 2001
Location:
Gallery 400
400 South Peoria Street, Chicago, IL 60607

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Participating Chicago Public Schools: ACT Charter, Blaine Elementary, Michele Clark, Hawthorne, Healy Elementary, Jenner Elementary, Kinzie Elementary, Lakeview High, Mitchell, Murray Elementary, Northside College Prep, Ogden, Orozco, Ray Elementary, and Telpochcalli.

Oral histories turned into collages express immigrant children ’s experiences in Chicago. Flipbooks reveal the multi-cultural faces of children in a Chicago kindergarten class. Photographs show the gentrification of communities. This is not your average art exhibit. Indivisible: Stories of Chicago Communities is a mixed-media display, a student art exhibit examining community, culture, gentrification, and cross-generational matters affecting today ’s Chicago Public Schools ’ classrooms, which includes works by kindergartners through high school students and incorporates artistic techniques ranging from photography and original music to puppetry and collage.

“The teachers involved in this exhibit use the creative process to integrate the arts into their social studies, reading, and writing lessons,” said Arnold Aprill, executive director of Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE). “The students also enjoyed the opportunity to take a unique look at their family histories and community issues and the chance to work together as teams.”

The show was inspired by Indivisible: Stories of American Communities, an exhibit at the Terra Museum of American Art in the fall of 2000. Indivisible was a project of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University in partnership with the Center for Creative Photography, the University of Arizona. Indivisible was funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts and was organized and circulated by the Center for Creative Photography, the University of Arizona. Additional support to increase access and educational opportunities was provided by The National Endowment for the Arts.

Related:

PRINT COLLATERAL

Postcard: Indivisible: Stories of Chicago Communities – Opening Reception

PRESS RELEASE

Indivisible: Stories of Chicago Communities

Gallery 400
Chicago, IL
May 25–June 6, 2001

Opening Reception: Beacon Street Gallery, May 25, 2001, 6–9 pm
Closing Reception: Gallery 400, June 1, 2001, 4–7 pm

Oral histories turned into collages express immigrant children ’s experiences in Chicago. Flip books exhibit the multi-cultural faces of children in a Chicago kindergarten class. Photographs show the gentrification of communities. This is not your average art exhibit. It ’s Indivisible: Stories of Chicago Communities, a presentation by Chicago Arts Partnership in Education (CAPE) and the Terra Museum of American Art.

The mixed-media display, a student art exhibit examining community, culture, gentrification and cross-generational matters affecting today ’s Chicago Public Schools ’ classrooms, shows works by kindergartners through high school students and incorporates artistic techniques ranging from photography and original music to puppetry and collage.

“The teachers involved in this exhibit used the creative process to integrate the arts into their social studies, reading and writing lessons,” says Arnold Aprill, executive director of CAPE. “The students also enjoyed the opportunity to take a unique look at their family histories and community issues and the chance to work together as teams.”

The exhibit runs from May 25 through June 6 at Beacon Street Gallery, 4131 North Broadway, and Gallery 400 at the University of Illinois at Chicago, 400 South Peoria Street. Both galleries are open to the public and admission is free. The opening celebration will be held at Beacon Street Gallery on May 25 from 6 pm to 9 pm, and the closing celebration will be held at Gallery 400 on June 1 from 4 pm to 7 pm.

The show was inspired by Indivisible: Stories of American Communities, an exhibit at the Terra Museum of American Art in the fall of 2000. Indivisible is a project of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University in partnership with the Center for Creative Photography, the University of Arizona. Indivisible is funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts. This exhibition was organized and circulated by the Center for Creative Photography, the University of Arizona. Additional support to increase access and educational opportunities was provided by The National Endowment for the Arts.

Founded in 1993 by a consortium of corporations and foundations, CAPE will serve more than 19,000 students in the Chicago Public Schools during the 2000–2001 school year. The CAPE model has been replicated across the United States, Canada, and Great Britain. CAPE recently published “Renaissance in the Classroom,” a nuts-and-bolts guide to arts integration for K-12 classroom teachers, arts teachers, and visiting artists. To purchase “Renaissance in the Classroom,” published by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., or to learn more about CAPE programs, visit www.capeweb.org.

Founded by Daniel J. Terra in 1980, the Terra Museum of American Art is dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of the cultural contributions made by American artists. Its collection includes notable works by Mary Cassatt, Winslow Homer, Maurice Prendergast, John Singer Sargent, James A. McNeill Whistler, Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, George Bellows, and many others. A second museum, Musée d ’Art Américain, Giverny, France opened in 1992. Both museums initiate and host a variety of exhibitions that explore issues in American art. For more information, please call the Terra Museum of American Art at 312-664-3939 or visit their website at www.terramuseum.org.

Gallery 400 is an arts presentation and exhibition space founded in 1983 at the University of Illinois at Chicago to cultivate innovation in art, design, and architecture. By presenting Indivisible: Stories of American Communities, Gallery 400 carries on its yearly tradition established in 1996 of partnering with arts-education organizations to exhibit artwork created by young people engaged in city-wide collaborative arts education projects.

EXHIBITION PROJECTS

ACT Charter School

Grades 9 – 11; Kris Sieloff and Mike Zenke, teachers; and Maria Clavick,
photographer
Documentary photography and oral histories

ACT Charter School

Grades 6 – 8; Anuj Vaidya, media artist; Street Level Youth Media; with ACT
teachers
Multi-channel video sculpture and installation

Speaking to the questions; how identity is tied to place,
what gives us a sense of home, and how a sense of home differs across
generations.

Blaine Elementary School – LEAP Partnership

Grade 6; Jen Harwig, teacher; Peter Walton, Art Teacher; and Amy Low,
LEAP musician
Photo-transfer Story Quilt with taped music and stories

Focusing on collecting family stories through parent
interviews, writing stories and creating songs to dispel racial stereotypes in
the classroom.

Hawthorne School – Hawthorne/Agassiz Partnership

Kindergarten; Wendee DeSent and Teresa Neff, teachers; and Jennifer Keats,
photographer
Creation of Flip Books of photographs with composite faces
of students, and students; photographs of where they sleep with reflections of
their bedtime rituals.

Dealing with the questions; how are we different? How are we
the same in this Kindergarten community?

Healy Elementary School – Bridgeport/Armor Square
Partnership

Grade 5; Mary Coughlan, teacher; and Bonnie Hill-Dowdy, Art Teacher
Large photographic panels of students within Bridgeport

Looking at how to discover unity through the community and
architecture of Bridgeport

Healy Elementary and Kinzie Elementary

Grade 7; Bart Rieger and Julie Pignataro, teachers; and Rosemary
Doolas, dancer/choreographer
Dance piece with visuals and video images

Exploring communication across different communities of two
very distinct populations of children, including a group that is hearing
impaired. Multiple forms of communication between the groups will include;
emails, sign language and the language of image and dance.

Jenner Elementary School

Grade 4; Matt Schergen, Art teacher; with Jenner classroom teachers
Architectural Models of communities

Exploring the questions; How are communities physically
organized? What do communities need to thrive? And what makes up a model
community?

Lakeview High School

Grades 9 – 11; Wendy Masto and Carmen Bauko, ESL teachers; and Esther Charbit,
artist LEAP
Three-paneled, free-standing mural

Documenting the immigration experiences of Lakeview students

Michele Clark School

Grade 8; Time Jones, teacher; Jesus Macarena-Avila, artist; and Shanti Foundation for Peace
Art installation of a Cause Quilt

Exploring how racism affects community identities in our history and today.

Mitchell School

Grade 7; Ted Lesley, Art teacher; and partner, Art Resources in
Teaching
Collage and photography installation

Using art as an access point to explore gentrification and
community change.

Murray Elementary and Ray Elementary / Southside Partnership

Grade 2 and Grade 8; Teachers across grade levels; Jeff Semmerling, mask
artist; and Eliza Duenow, Hyde Park Art Center
Collaboratively-built, giant, Exquisite Corpse Puppet

Documenting the process of building the puppet and exploring
community, cultural identity and representation, and promoting collaboration
among the children at both schools to create a unity of vision.

Northside College Prep

Grades 9 – 12; Jorge Lucero, art teacher; with other teachers at NSCP
Art work that blurs the boundaries between photography and drawing

Investigating how photographs parallel other methods of
picture making and exploring environmental and community issues.

Ogden School

Grade 4; Mike Tavell, teacher; with Rebecca Roin and Scott Sikkema,
Terra Museum
Documentary Photography and Oral Histories

Recording the lives and hopes of homeless Streetwise vendors

Orozco School and Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum Partnership

Grade 7; Vicki Turbov, Aandraya da Silva, and Maria Economou, teachers; with Jennifer Jensen and Ed Pino, art teachers
Retablos (Mexican paintings on tin) installation

Documenting the Pilsen community and students ’ reactions to
attitudes about Pilsen.

Telpochcalli School and MFACM Partnership

Grade 8; Vicki Trinder, teacher; and Guillermo Delgado, artist
Student self portraits of themselves as Community Heroes

Sharing students ’ heroic images of themselves, and their
stories, with younger Telpochcalli students.

EXHIBITION SUPPORT

Indivisible is a project of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University in partnership with the Center for Creative Photography, the University of Arizona. Indivisible is funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts and was organized and circulated by the Center for Creative Photography, the University of Arizona. Additional support to increase access and educational opportunities is provided by The National Endowment for the Arts.