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Between Sound and Vision

Thursday, February 15, 2001–Saturday, March 10, 2001

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Curated by Jeremy Boyle, Nathaniel Braddock, Dasha Dekleva, Kristina Dziedzic, Hannah Higgins, and Laila Korn with contributions from the Sound and Vision seminar at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Between Sound and Vision features an international array of artists, composers, and musicians from Indonesia, Japan, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Canada, and the United States whose work emphasizes an interplay between aural and visual sensory perception. The exhibit ’s roots belong to the extended circle of composers, performance artists, visual artists, and poets associated with experimental composer John Cage. In 1969, Cage edited the seminal book Notations (Something Else Press), the first collection ever of graphic scores by over 150 artists. Differing from traditional notations that posit specific notes onto staves within measured tempos, these compositions employ visual elements to convey suggestions for musical sounds.

Since the 1970s, the hand-painted, penciled, printed, and collaged scores were tucked away in the Northwestern University Music Library, where they were rarely seen and almost never heard. Remarkable not only for their visual impact, these pieces also demonstrate the inextricable connection between seeing and hearing, and usher the viewer/listener into an interstitial space between music and visual art. The exhibition includes a selection of those original “Notations,” in addition to the recorded audio interpretations of them and the contemporary performative and interactive sculptural and installation works.

Contemporary works that exemplify Cage ’s legacy range from recent graphic notations by Philip Corner, David Dunn, Dick Higgins, and Yasunao Tone to the sculptural instruments of Jeremy Boyle, Heri Dono, Joe Jones, Alison Knowles, Minoru Sato (m/s), Charlotte Moorman, Carolee Schneemann, Dan Senn, William Stone, Trimpin, and Yoshi Wada to installations by Phill Niblock, Paul Panhuysen, Achim Wollscheid, and Brandon LaBelle. Jack Ox extends the principle of visual sound translation, and poetry by Kenneth Goldsmith in collaboration with Joan La Barbara provides an extraordinary intertextual experience. Finally, Hildegard Westerkamp ’s sound recordings of ambient noise expands on Cage ’s famous 4 ’ 33” and brings the exhibit full circle to its origin. Between Sound and Vision engages its audience in a uniquely conjoined act of listening and seeing, and creates space(s) for truly interactive experiences.

A compact disc catalogue, which includes interpretations of graphic scores never before recorded, accompanies the lectures, special concerts, website, and community outreach programs associated with this exhibition. The opening reception includes performances by Cube, Eric Andersen, Alison Knowles, Paul Panhuysen, and others.

MEDIA COVERAGE

Artner, Alan G. “A Sound exhibition that’s out of sight.” Chicago Tribune, Mar. 8, 2001, Temp Section, p. 2.

Camper, Fred. “In the Moments.” Chicago Reader, Mar. 2, 2001, Section 1, p. 22-23.

Kendrick, Monica. “Between Sound and Vision.” New Art Examiner, Sep., 2001, p. 86.

Margasak, Peter. “Post No Bills: Off the Charts.” Chicago Reader, Feb. 9, 2001, Section 3, p. 1.

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST

Eric Anderson

I HAVE CONFIDENCE IN YOU, OPUS 51, 1964

Jeremy Boyle

Digital Birds, 2001
Electronic sound circuits

Philip Corner

One Note Once, late 1990s
Computer graphic on paper, 11 x 8 1/2 in.

Heri Dono

Animal Journey (video excerpts), 1997–2000
Acrylic board and two drawings on paper, 7 1/4 x 9 3/8 in., drawings 8 1/2 x 11 in. each

David Dunn

Chreiai 1, 1996
Computer graphic on paper and text, 11 x 8 1/2 in. each

Chreiai 1, 1996
Audio recording, 14:45 min.

Kenneth Goldsmith

Poem 13, Poem 22, Poem 60 (from 73 Poems series), 1993
Lithographs, 30 x 22 in. each

Dick Higgins

1,000 Symphonies, 1990
Music paper with bullet holes, 48 x 24 in.

Joe Jones

Pull-toy (from the Longest Pull-toy in the world), 1968
Barrel slats, wood, violin strings, violin bridge, and tuning pins on wheels, with C-print of Pull-toy by Geoff Hendricks, 30 x 36 in., C-print 20 x 24 in.

Alison Knowles

Onion Skin Song: Song #1 of Three Songs, 1979
Blueprint, 120 x 36 in.

Selections from Seven Indian Moons: Dark Red Calf Moon – February, Oglala Sioux, 1980
Objects, installation, dimensions variable

Joan La Barbara

Poem 13, Poem 22, Poem 60 (from 73 Poems CD), 1993
Audio recordings, 0:42, 0:25, 0:23 min.

Charlotte Moorman

Shadow of my Cello, 1988
Plexiglas cutout, 48 x 15 1/2 in.

Max Neuhaus

Max-Feed, 1968
Electronic components in acrylic boxes

Phil Niblock

imagedissolve, 1985–2000
Computer controlled/projected images, 60:00–120:00 min. cycle
Music: Five More String Quartets

Jack Ox

Handmade score showing pitch, rhythm, and phonetic transcription into the International Phonetic Alphabet
pencil on graph paper, 19 1/2 x 13 3/4 in.

Merzbau drawing for the first theme: Fümms bö wö tää zää Uo pögiff KwiiEe, 1992
Pencil on Transpagra three-layer paper with colored pencil, 36 x 60 in.

Page of final score for Ursonate Visualization
Colored pencil and pencil on graph paper, 18 x 22 in.

Scores: computer analysis of Ernst Schwitters’s 1950 recording, 1991
Xerox, 11 3/4 x 16 1/2 in.

Ursonate Visualization, Sections 23–32 from the first movement and second theme: Fümms bö wö tää zää Uo pögiff KwiiEe, 1993
Oil paint on mylar, hand-collaged, ten sections, 12 x 48 in. each

Paul Panhuysen

5 x 400 = 2000, 2001
Long strings (steel), five tin garbage bins, and motors

Minorus Sato

emerging from the perturbation field: 2000, 2000
Florescent lamps, solar panels, acrylic case, and loudspeaker, 51 1/4 x 16 1/2 x 1 5/8 in. and 47 1/4 x 8 1/4 x 2 in. (material size)

Carolee Schneemann

Cycladic Imprints (detail), 1991–93
Motorized violin, 23 x 14 x 9 in., and panel, 70 x 12 x 2 in.

Dan Senn

Vertical ‘lyre 1, 1997
Kinetic sound sculpture (wood, wire, and electronics), 40 x 20 x 8 in.

William Stone

Dissipation, 1996
Plastic tubes, enameled funnel, steel, wood, water pump, and water, 84 x 30 x 30 in.

Yasunao Tone

Untitled, 1985
Ink on paper, 10 x 14 in.

Trimpin

Bängtschbäng, 1989–2001
Wood, metal, and electronics, 72 in. (diameter)

Yoshi Wada

Alarming Trash Can, 1990
Galvanized metal trash can, alarm bells, and siren, 25 x 22 in. (diameter)

Hildegard Westrkamp

Beneath the Forest Floor (from Transformations CD, 1996), 1992
Audio recording, 17:23 min.

Achim Wollscheid and Brandon LaBelle

piece for a listener, 2001
Five cardboard boxes with ten postcards each, installation on and off the UIC campus, 5 1/8 x 4 3/8 in.

NOTATIONS SCORES

Larry Austin

Square, 1963
One page, ink, and typing on transparent master sheet, 11 1/8 x 16 1/2 in.

George Brecht

3 Seed Events

One page, ink on paper, 3 x 5 in.

Joseph Byrd

The Defense of the American Continent from the Viet-Cong Invasion

Ink on paper, one page of instructions

George Cacioppo

Cassiopeia

One page, ink on vellum, 16 x 11 in.

John Cage

Concert for piano and orchestra

Twelve pages, ink on music paper, 17 1/8 x 11 in. each

Philip Corner

Mississippi River South of Memphis, 1954
Map with ink-on-tissue overlay, with three acetate overlays and sheet of directions, 28 x 7 1/4 in.

Malcolm Goldstein

Page 9 from Illuminations from Fantastic Gardens

Two pages, ink on paper, 11 x 8 1/8 in. each

Al Hansen

Car Bibbe

Three pages, ink on paper, 8 3/8 x 14 in.

Dick Higgins

Graphis #21 (from Act 3 of St. Joan at Beaurevoir)
One page, colored inks on graph paper, 15 1/4 x 14 1/2 in.

Toshi Ichiyangi

The Field, 1966
Two pages, embossed paper, with instruction card, 17 1/2 x 12 3/8 in. each

Charles Ives

One page, blank song paper signed by Ives, 10 1/2 x 13 5/8 in.

Allan Kaprow

Self-Service, 1966
Four pages, colored inks on yellow ruled paper collaged onto cardboard, with printed directions, 17 3/8 x 17 3/4 in. each

Alison Knowles

Blue Ram, 1967
Six pages, six silkscreen prints on cardboard, 18 7/8 x 28 3/8 in. overall

György Ligeti

From Volumina, 1961
One page, pencil on paper, 16 1/4 x 11 5/8 in.

Otto Luening

Rorschach Symphonic Sonata

Four pages, folded, pencil, ink and red crayon on paper, 12 3/4 x 18 3/8 in. each

Tomás Marco

, 1965
One page, ink on paper, 7 1/4 x 9 1/4 in.

Walter Mays

Sketch for sound block one from Music of Mountains, 1967
One page, ink on paper, 12 x 9 in.

Yoko Ono

9 Concert Pieces for John Cage

Fourteen pages, ink on paper (out of fifteen pieces, John Cage was asked to choose the nine he liked best), 8 x 10 in.

Nam June Paik

Danger Musik for Dick Higgins

One page, ink on mended tissue, 8 1/4 x 11 3/8 in.

Steve Reich

Piano Phase

One page, ink on vellum, 10 7/8 x 13 3/8 in.

Jerome Rothenberg

Garbage Event

One page, typing on paper, 8 1/2 x 11 in.

James Tenney

String Complement, 1964
One page, ink on graph paper, with instructions

David Tudor

From Solo for Piano (Cage) for Indeterminacy, 1958
Nineteen pages, notebook, pencil on paper, 8 1/4 x 6 1/8 in. closed

Wolf Vostell

TV-Décollage-Ereignisse für Millionen, 1959
One page, collage, fluorescent, black and colored ink on paper, 25 1/4 x 19 1/8 in.

Yannis Xenakis

Stochastic Music

Nine pages, typewriter, computer type on accordion-folded paper (programs of instructions for IBM 7094), 15 3/8 x 11 in. each

La Monte Young

From Vertical Hearing or Hearing in the Present Tense, 1967
Six pages, ink on paper (with undated letter used as cover, and errata sheet), 11 x 13 3/4 in. each

OPENING FESTIVAL PERFORMANCES:

Eric Anderson with UIC students
OPUS 2001

Jeremy Boyle, Nathaniel Braddock, Jerome Bryerton, Guillermo Gregorio, Brent Gutzeit, Fred Lonberg-Holm, Todd Margasak, and Scott Rosenberg

Audience-directed composition-improvisation performance

CUBE: Janice Misurell Mitchell (flute, voice), Patricia Morehead (oboe, English horn), John Johnson (percussion), Philip Morehead (synthesizer)
Selected scores from Notations

Alison Knowles with Jeremy Boyle and Ron Fong

Onion Skin Song

Paul Panhuysen

Long string performance

EXHIBITION SUPPORT

Between Sound and Vision is supported by the College of Architecture and the Arts, the University of Illinois at Chicago; a grant from the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency; the UIC Graduate Student Council; Hermann Braun; the John W. and Clara C. Higgins Foundation; Laurie and Alan Reinstein; and the Gilbert and Lila Silverman Collection.

Curated by Hannah Higgins, Dasha Dekleva, Kristina Dziedzic, Jeremy Boyle, Laila Korn, and Nathaniel Braddock
Between Sound and Vision

Gallery 400
Chicago, IL
February 15–March 10, 2001

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 15, 2001, 5–8 pm

Gallery 400 at the University of Illinois at Chicago presents Between Sound and Vision, a multi-sensory exhibition of graphic notations, sculptural instruments, and sound installations. The opening reception is Thursday, February 15 from 5 to 8pm and includes performances by Cube, Eric Andersen, Alison Knowles, and Paul Panhuysen. Gallery 400 is located at 400 South Peoria Street.

Between Sound and Vision features an international array of artists, composers, and musicians from Indonesia, Japan, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Canada, and the United States whose work emphasizes an interplay between aural and visual sensory perception. The exhibit ’s roots belong to the extended circle of composers, performance artists, visual artists, and poets associated with experimental composer John Cage. In 1969, Cage edited the seminal book Notations (Something Else Press), the first collection ever of graphic scores by over 150 artists. Different from traditional notations that posit specific notes onto staves within measured tempos, these compositions employ visual elements to convey suggestions for musical sounds.

Since the 1970s, the hand-painted, penciled, printed, and collaged scores have been tucked away in the Northwestern University Music Library where they are rarely seen and almost never heard. Remarkable for their visual impact alone, these pieces also demonstrate the inextricable connection between seeing and hearing, and usher the viewer/listener into an interstitial space between music and visual art.

Contemporary works that exemplify Cage ’s legacy range from recent graphic notations by Philip Corner, David Dunn, Dick Higgins, and Yasunao Tone to the sculptural instruments of Jeremy Boyle, Heri Dono, Joe Jones, Alison Knowles, Minoru Sato (m/s), Charlotte Moorman, Carolee Schneemann, Dan Senn, William Stone, Trimpin, and Yoshi Wada to installations by Phill Niblock, Paul Panhuysen, Achim Wollscheid, and Brandon LaBelle. Jack Ox extends the principle of visual sound translation and poetry by Kenneth Goldsmith in collaboration with Joan La Barbara provides an extraordinary intertextual experience. Finally, Hildegard Westerkamp ’s sound recordings of ambient noise expand on Cage ’s famous 4 ’ 33” and bring the exhibit full circle to its origin.

A compact disc catalogue, which includes interpretations of graphic scores never before recorded, accompanies the lectures, special concerts, website, and community outreach programs associated with this exhibition. Between Sound and Vision engages its audience in a uniquely conjoined act of listening and seeing, and creates space(s) for truly interactive experiences.

PRINT COLLATERAL

Postcard: Between Sound and Vision – Opening Reception

Between Sound And Vision

Between Sound and Vision

Catalogue introduction by Lorelei Stewart and essays by
Hannah Higgins, Kristina Dzeidzic, and Dasha Dekleva.
Gallery 400, School of Art and Design,
University of Illinois at Chicago, 2001
28 pp., 8.5 x 5.5 in., with black and white reproductions
and a 15 track audio CD

This catalogue can be purchased for $15.00 plus shipping by calling Gallery 400 at 312-996-6114.